Partner News

Babson Graduate School Named No. 1 Entrepreneurship Program By The Princeton Review And Entrepreneur

Today, The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur released their lists of the Top 25 Graduate and Undergraduate Programs for Entrepreneurs.
..“No matter what our graduates leave here to do, or where they go to work, they will encounter challenges, opportunities, and new ideas,” shared Candida Brush, vice provost of Global Entrepreneurial Learning at Babson College. Read more >>

When product development goes sideways (and how to fix it)

Product development going wrong? You may need a tiger team.
By Jeff Champagne and Eric Claude, MPR Associates, Inc.
We would all like for product development projects to go smoothly and predictably, but you know what they say about “the best-laid plans.” Robert Burns aside, when needed technologies do not integrate as easily as planned, hardware or software bugs crop up at the last minute (or worse, cause failures in the field), or project teams struggle to complete work on schedule, […]

BBJ announces 2018 Best Places to Work honorees

The Boston Business Journal today announced its annual Best Places to Work honorees — 80 companies in the Greater Boston area run the gamut of sizes and span a wide range of industries while all share the common goal of creating enjoyable workplaces. Portfolio companies Carbonite, Wasabi and Boston Harbor Angels sponsor, Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP, have all been nominated. Read more >>

Female CEOs get only 3% of venture capital money

One of the study’s coauthors, Candida Brush of Babson College, pointed out that there’s nothing indicating men are more capable of running successful businesses. Brush said they ran an additional test comparing the companies with female CEOs (there were 183) to companies in similar industries run by men. They found that the women CEOs were equally as likely to stay in business and have a positive exit as their male counterparts. Read more >>

Women-led U.S. startups attract just fraction of venture money

In the new study, researchers examined nearly 7,000 U.S. companies that received venture capital between 2011 and 2013. They then identified companies with women on their executive team.
Just why women-led companies were recipient of less venture capital raised questions about the industry’s inner workings, said co-author Candida Brush, a professor of entrepreneurship at Babson College in Massachusetts. Read more >>